Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Chief Petty Officer Induction

       
Normally I wouldn't post about my husbands job or rank, but it occurred to me yesterday while talking to another Navy wife that there are probably other spouses out there going through the same thing I am. Hopefully this will help them understand what their sailor is going through and why.  Also so they know that they are not alone, other navy spouses are there for them and hopefully a command that they can turn to. Also I am so proud of my husband and want to do a little... or a lot... of bragging!! I am so happy and proud of my husband for making Chief after ten years in the Navy, he works very hard and I think he deserved this promotion ;)

Almost from the minute he made chief, the Chief induction began. For those of you who don't know what this is, it is basically 6 weeks of training and mentoring, ending with a final night of chief-select training and a pining ceremony. Induction plays a very important role in the sailor becoming a chief; it teaches them discipline, time management, and leadership which are all fundamental in becoming an effective chief. This process is voluntary, but highly recommended. They work long hours and between training and fundraising, most weekends as well. {my husband and puppy are currently curled up at the foot of the bed passed out, he has to be up at 2:45 in the morning, to me that's the middle of the night!} This is very stressful for the sailor as well as their family.    

My husbands command has been very supportive through the whole process. His Master Chief called me the day after the results were posted to explain to me the process and the meaning and tradition behind the induction and ceremonies. As a newer Navy wife I found this especially helpful since I had no idea what to expect or the meaning behind, well, anything to do with becoming Chief {besides what I read on the internet}. He also told me to not hesitate to call him if I had any question. The command has also had several weekend events for the Chief selectees and their families. This was great for me being new to the command, it gave me an opportunity to meet fellow wives who were going through the same things we were. Military wives are the strongest women I know and I consider myself grateful and lucky to be considered one of them! 

I can only speak about my experience, but we have had a lot of support and hope that other spouses do too. I know that not having children has obviously made this process easier on us than on others, but I have also found it helpful to become involved in command activities and Chief selectee fundraisers.  I am trying to help my husband out as much as possible, which is definately making it easier on both of us. 

The induction period ends with a pinning ceremony. Where the new chiefs "Anchors" are pinned on by a person of their choosing. I will be pinning my husband! 

The Chief Petty Officer's Pledge

I AM A CHIEF PETTY OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY...

-- I SERVE MY COUNTRY AND HER PEOPLE WITH PRIDE AND HONOR.
-- I SEEK NO SPECIAL FAVORS.
-- I MAKE THINGS HAPPEN, AND DO THE BEST I CAN DO.
-- I AM CHARGED WITH A LEADERSHIP ROLE LIKE NO OTHER IN THE WORLD.
-- I DEVELOP JUNIOR OFFICERS AND MOLD MY SAILORS.
-- I ACKNOWLEDGE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACTIONS OF MY SAILORS...
-- BECAUSE THESE SAILORS ARE THE SEEDS OF FUTURE CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS.
-- I LIVE BY THE NAVY'S CORE VALUES OF HONOR, COURAGE AND COMMITMENT.
-- I SET THE EXAMPLE.
-- I ESTABLISH THE STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE.
-- MY SAILORS ARE STUDENTS AND I AM THEIR TEACHER.
-- I GUIDE AND INFLUENCE THE LIVES OF THESE YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN.
-- IN THE FINAL ANALYSIS, I WILL DETERMINE THE QUALITY OF THESE SAILORS.
-- THEY LOOK UP TO ME BECAUSE I TREAT THEM WITH DIGNITY AND RESPECT.
-- BECAUSE THEY NEED A LEADER, I AM THERE FOR THEM.
-- AFTER ALL..

I AM A CHIEF PETTY OFFICER IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY.

I AM A MILITARY WIFE 

I am a military wife -- a member of that sisterhood of women who have had the courage to watch their men go into battle, and the strength to survive until their return. 

Our sorority knows no rank, for we earn our membership with a marriage license, traveling over miles, or over nations to begin a new life with our military husbands.

Within days, we turn a barren, echoing building into a home, and though our quarters are inevitably white-walled and unpapered, we decorate with the treasures of our travels, for we shop the markets of the globe. Using hammer and nail, we tack our pictures to the wall, and our roots to the floor as
firmly as if we had lived there for a lifetime. We hold a family together by the bootstraps, and raise the best of "brats," instilling in them the motto, "Home is togetherness," whether motel, or guest house, apartment or duplex. 

As military wives we soon realize that the only good in "Good-bye" is the "Hello again." 

For as salesmen for freedom, our husbands are often on the road, at sea, or in the sky, leaving us behind for a week, a month, an assignment. During separations we guard the home front, existing until the homecoming. Unlike our civilian counterparts, we measure time, not by years, but by tours -- married
at Knox, a baby born at Portsmouth, a special anniversary at Yorktown, a promotion in McDill. 

We plant trees, and never see them grow tall, work on projects completed long after our departure, and enhance our community for the betterment of those who come after us. We leave a part of ourselves at every stop. Through experience, we have learned to pack a suitcase, a car or hold baggage, and live
indefinitely from the contents within: and though our fingers are sore from the patches we have sewn, and the silver we have shined, our hands are always ready to help those around us.

Women of peace, we pray for a world in harmony, for the flag that leads our men into battle, will also blanket them in death. Yet we are an optimistic group, thinking of the good, and forgetting the bad, cherishing yesterday, while anticipating tomorrow.

Never rich by monetary standards, our hearts are overflowing with a wealth of experiences common only to those united by the special tradition of military life. 

We pass on this legacy to every military bride, welcoming her with outstretched arms, with love and friendship, from one sister to another, sharing in the bounty of our unique, fulfilling military way of life. 

The information disclosed above regarding military tradition is widely available on the Internet. Which is where I learned most of it during my research before speaking to our Master Chief.  For my resources and  more information please visit
           Goatlocker.org

5 comments:

  1. congrats Anne and thanks for sharing! There is so much about the military I know nothing about.

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  2. Wow, I really enjoyed reading that. Congrats to you and your husband!

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  3. Congrats to your husband! What a wonderful accomplishment and step in his career.

    My father was a chief in the Navy, but I was too young to know what it took for him to become one. So, your post was really informative. I'll have to give him a call and chat with him about it! :)

    Congrats again!

    Big hugs,
    Kristina

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  4. (I hope it is not inappropriate for me to post here. I stumbled across your post on the internet looking up more information regarding the chief induction.)

    Congratulations to your husband and you as well!! I know that this process is not easy for either the inductee or their spouse.
    My Son has also been made a chief and will be pinned on September 16th. Maybe your husband and my son know each other. I am very fortunate and will be flying to San Diego for the pinning ceremony.

    As a father I could not be prouder. I have spoken to him and his new wife Jen a few times and have been able to get a feel for what they go through. Your post helps all of those not directly involved get more of a sense of the process, making us even prouder of the men and women who have all worked so hard to achieve this rank and honor.

    Again Congratulations!!!


    A Proud Father,

    Chris

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  5. Thanks everyone, we are so happy and I am so proud!!

    @Chris, congratulations to your son as well. Making Chief is a huge accomplishment and I am sure you are just as proud as I am! Only 3% of enlisted military ever make Chief, so he is one of the select few. My husband is currently attached to a reserve squadron, although we are active duty, so our pinning is on the 17th. I hope you enjoy San Diego, it is a beautiful city and the weather has been gorgeous! Thanks for your comment!

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